vacation

0

A TripAdvisor™ TripWow slideshow of a travel blog to Flores, Guatemala by TravelPod blogger Cathandnick titled “Tikal me pink” Cathandnick’s travel blog entry: “So here we were, are second Mayan site in Central America, The Tikal ruins, the mother of all Mayan ruins and one of the world’s wonders and another UNESCO world heritage site. It is a spiritual place with immense pyramids reaching out of the think jungle canerpy. If Copan was the cultural centre of the Mayan world then Tikal was the wealthy metropolis with an estimated 100000 inhabitants and held the seat of power for the so named Jaguar Lords. If I were to live in this time I think I would rather be named Jaguar than the Copan Lord named Rabbit! Tikal ruler: “I am lord Jaguar of the Gigantic Tikal! Who are you? Copan Ruler: ‘Ooooh ‘ello, my name is Rabbit 13 and my little town has lots of pretty carvings. Its sooo nice and quaint you know, Ooooh and so cultural too mmmmm, chase me!’ Tikal ruler: “Kill him!”) Anyway if one requires more facts and figures on Tikal one can visit many website. Although the above conversation between the two rulers is not fact, apparently the Copan ruler was murdered by the Tikal Lords because that is what happened to any ruler whose team lost at the famous ball game. The scaffolding went up in Tikal around 600BC and building continued for the next 1500 years highlighting just how long the Mayan civilization was around for and how young in comparison our own historic existence is

wind chimes

Filed under Mayan Hammocks by on . Comment#

0

A TripAdvisor™ TripWow slideshow of a travel blog to Colon, Panama by TravelPod blogger Tokenhippygirl titled “Panama” Tokenhippygirl’s travel blog entry: “We arrived in Panama and headed out on our excursion to visit the Panama C****, visit an Embera Indian village, and enjoy a mini hike through the jungle to a very cool waterfall. First, the c****. What a spectacular site. To think of the effort that went into creating such a modern wonder. Here we saw a huge ships, passing through the Gatun Locks, and a US Naval submarine doing the same. It was great timing, and we felt completely impressed by the process, and the sheer size of the ship. It looked like there were only an inch or two between the side of the vessel and the edge of the c****. It was impressive. The ship powers through, with ac**** pilot on board (all ships passing through the c****, big to small, must have ac**** pilot on board), assisted only by four locomotive engines meant to keep it steady in the channel. I’d say the whole process, from when it entered the first lock to when it passed us, took about 20 minutes. It didn’t seem that long. Really, it was amazing. The next part of our journey in Panama took us, by dugout canoe, to the Embera Indian Village located up the Chagres River in part of what is still considered the Amazon rain forest. The trip by canoe was lovely, really, until we reached a huge section of open water, and the wind came up. At that point it was a bit nerve racking. The swells got

wind chimes

Filed under Hand-crafted Hammocks by on . Comment#

0

A TripAdvisor™ TripWow slideshow of a travel blog to Somewhere between Semuc Champey and Lanquin, and Chichi, Guatemala by TravelPod blogger Escapingseattle titled “Semuc Champey and Chichicastenango” Escapingseattle’s travel blog entry: “I left lake Atitlan traveling with the Swiss girl I had shared a hotel with in San Pedro. She was headed for Chichicastenango for its famous market and invited me along. I was glad I went, the market was the biggest I’d ever seen and full of so many intricate, handwoven crafts, colorful painted masks, jewelry of silver, jade and turquoise, Guatemalan style clothing and more of the usual tourist trinkets. We spent hours wandering around and helped each other bargain for some great stuff. The children in Chichi followed us at times asking for “one Quetzal” over and over. The city itself was also quite pretty with cobblestone streets, red tiled roofs and whitewashed buildings. After a night in Chichi I parted from my Swiss companion and headed for Coban to see Semuc Champey while she headed for Xela. I was irritated that I had to go through Guatemala City as I was hoping to avoid the place altogether. No luck there, I ended up getting stuck in the city several times on the trip. When I got to “Guate” (as all the bus drivers call it) I asked around about how to get to Coban. A Guatemalan woman tried to give me directions but eventually led me to where I could take a bus, going way out of her way. I hopped on a city bus and the driver and his

wind chimes

Filed under Hand-crafted Hammocks by on . Comment#

0

A TripAdvisor™ TripWow slideshow of a travel blog to Flores, Peten, Guatemala by TravelPod blogger Leeinkster titled “Tikal” Leeinkster’s travel blog entry: “A short flight north to the Guatemalan jungle to find: Mayan archeological treasures at Tikal, a thatched-roof hut of my own on the shores of Lago de Peten Itza, a hammock overlooking the lake, a French restaurant 100 m. from my hut, horseback rides on jungle trails, kayaking on the lake. Well….all but the last two became reality. This was due to heat-stroke following my day at Tikal. The rest of my stay in El Remate, Peten, was spent prostrate, dizzy, nauseated, trying to get my faulty internal temperature regulation to cool down with cold compresses and rest until the wicked heat-stroke passed. Memories of Nepal, and a firm resolution never to stay in absurdly hot places without air con available. The mind is strong, but the body is weak!!!” Read and see more at: www.travelpod.com Photos from this trip: 1. “My El Remate hut on Lago de Peten Itza” 2. “On the shores of Lago de Peten Itza” 3. “The Mayans were here” 4. “The Mayans were here too” 5. “Lee finds another Shaman (are they stalking me?)” 6. “Lee and the Ceiba tree” See this TripWow and more at tripwow.tripadvisor.com

wind chimes

Filed under Mayan Hammocks by on . Comment#

0

A TripAdvisor™ TripWow slideshow of a travel blog to Chichén Itzá, Mexico by TravelPod blogger Endsoftheearth titled “On the Mayan Road” Endsoftheearth’s travel blog entry: “From the hot and steamy humidity of Palenque, and least expecting it, we stepped up on to what was to be the most freezing cold bus on the trip so far. We’d be warned to get on the overnight buses prepared, as each bus company takes pride in having the best air-conditioned 80km/hr bullet running the route. Our goal was to head to the famed Toltec-Maya ruins of Chichén Itzá, although first we would be spending a couple of days each getting acquainted with the Spanish colonial towns of Mérida and Valladolid. Not on the tourist trail, we found these to be worthwhile introductions to Yucatán peninsula and found the people really open to have a chat and give us tips for what to do (granted, their commission to send us to their mate’s hat and hammock factory may have been on their minds more than ours, but what the hey). In Mérida we saw some impressive wall sized murals by the yucateco painter Fernando Castro Pacheco in the Palacio del Gobierno. The paintings depicted the Maya people in a dramatic form: identity, great civilizations, enslavement at the hands of the Spaniards, Christianity, and freedom. Another highlight of Mérida was wandering the huge food market and buying the ingredients for our own hostel-made guacamole – a huge avocado, tortilla chips, limes, coriander and a little habana chilli all

wind chimes

Filed under Mayan Hammocks by on . Comment#

Register Login