Mayan Hammocks

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Thicker string makes comfort last longerFind spacious comfort beauty and durability with the XXL Mazatlan Thick String Mayan hammock. This hammock has strings four times thicker than our regular Mayan to make it stronger. Using the same ancient diamond weave technique this hammock is still dangerously comfortable. The hand-weaving of the incredibly soft cotton string is the secret to this hammock’s unmatched comfort and superior strength. Many of our customers who have traveled abroad have loved the style of Mayan Nicaraguan and Brazilian hammocks because of their high comfort level. These hammocks are often used as beds so feel free to use them to their full potential.Cotton as a material will move and breathe with you. If comfort is your driver

 

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PLAYLIST: www.youtube.com Appearing during the middle two hours, author Daniel Pinchbeck discussed the radical changes happening in society and the world, and where we are headed as we approach 2012. He also touched on psychedelic and shamanic experiences. Evolution has shifted from survival of the fittest to the level of consciousness, culture, and metaphysics, he commented. As we move into alignment with the galactic center, the current paradigm is ending like a snake shedding its skin, and there are great opportunities for change, he continued. He suggested that people regain basic life skills, such as farming and herbalism, in the event of some type of upheaval in America, such as outlined in the book Reinventing Collapse by Dmitry Orlov. Pinchbeck also spoke about shifting to a new monetary system that is not based on competition and scarcity. For instance, as Bernard Lietaer has proposed, there could be a trading currency that has negative interest which would discourage people from hoarding, and create community bonds. A number of these ideas are explored in the new documentary, 2012: Time for Change, based in part on Pinchbeck’s books. Shamanism and ayahuasca (hallucinogenic plant) journeys are receiving increased attention. “One of the most beautiful experiences I’ve had with ayahuasca,” said Pinchbeck, was working with the Secoya tribe in Ecuador, where the all shamans lie in hammocks in a temple and sing specific icaros in which “you feel like they’re guiding

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Freya Wettergren asleep in Brazilian Hammock

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The Nicamaka Couples is the world’s most luxurious and comfotable hammock. See and hear about Nicamaka’s quality, beauty and see a demonstration of how to easily stow your hammock for safe keeping. For more information please call 866-377-122. www.buyhammocks.com & www.nicamaka.com

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A TripAdvisor™ TripWow video of a travel blog to Rio Dulce, Guatemala by TravelPod blogger Greg-adrienne. See this TripWow and more at tripwow.tripadvisor.com Eastern Guatemala “We crossed into Guatemala on June 22, and the process was fairly uneventful thanks to the assistance of the English-speaking “guide” we used, 14 year-old Edwin. The northeast corner of Guatemala is remote and not heavily inhabited and as soon we crossed the border the road conditions/standard of living noticeably deteriorated. Our first stop was the Mayan ruins at Tikal, which are about a 2-hour drive from the border. There are some stories circulating on the Net about tourists being targeted here, although nothing in recent months. Nonetheless, we were happy to give a lift to a guy whom we had met at our last campsite in Belize. Given that he was an accountant from Idaho, we felt our odds of him using us as drug trafficking “mules” was pretty low. (Key facts about Guatemala: the largest Central American country population wise with about 14 million people, 44 percent of whom are Mayan. About the size of Tennessee). From Tikal we headed due south to the Rio Dulce/Lake Isabal area, which is the tiny strip of Guatemala that touches on the Caribbean. En route, we stopped for 2 nights at Finca Ixobel (see below). The scenic highlights of this stretch were the small hills/earth mounds that look like buried Mayan pyramids and the pine-tree forests. Rio Dulce is the name of both a river that flows into

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